Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Provides Superior Clinical and Radiological Outcomes Compared to High Tibial Osteotomy at a Follow-Up of 5–8 Years

Research output: Journal article (peer-reviewed)Journal article

Abstract

Background: Knee Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease. Initially, the medial compartments are affected in most cases. For this pathology, joint preservation is preferable. Two surgical procedures aim to meet this goal: high-tibial osteotomy (HTO) and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The aim was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of HTO versus UKA in patients with unicompartmental, medial OA. Method: Retrospective case series. A total of 86 (61 UKA, 25 HTO) patients that received either treatment at a single, specialized center were assessed pre-operatively and at a single follow-up examination at 77.13 months (±8.170). The Knee Society Score (KSS), range of motion (ROM), SF36 questionnaire and the Tegner score were used. The Kellgren–Lawrence score was assessed pre- and post-surgically. Survivorship with the endpoint “revision” was assessed. Results: The UKA group showed significantly better improvements in KSS scores for pain (p < 0.006) and function (p < 0.001). OA progression (p < 0.02) and survivorship (p < 0.018) differed, significantly favoring UKA. ROM, SF36 and Tegner score did not differ significantly. Conclusions: The presented mid-to long-term data suggest that UKA provides superior results in selected outcomes. Nevertheless, significant differences in the demographics of treatments indicate the challenge of comparing these two treatments.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5387
Pages (from-to)5387
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume12
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Aug 2023

Keywords

  • high-tibial osteotomy
  • joint preservation
  • unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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