Refined Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetoencephalography Mapping Reveals Reorganization in Language-Relevant Areas of Lesioned Brains

Max Zimmermann, Karl Rössler, Martin Kaltenhäuser, Peter Grummich, Bing Yang, Michael Buchfelder, Arnd Doerfler, Konrad Kölble, Andreas Stadlbauer

Research output: Journal article (peer-reviewed)Journal article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Neurosurgical decisions regarding interventions close to brain areas with language-related functions remain highly challenging because of the risk of postoperative dysfunction. To minimize these risks, improvements in the preoperative mapping of language-related regions are required, especially as space-occupying lesions often lead to altered cortical topography and language area reorganization.

METHODS: The degree of deviation and language area reorganization were investigated in 26 functional magnetic resonance imaging- and magnetoencephalography-dissociable cortical sub-areas displaying language-related activations in each of 18 patients with brain lesions and 3 healthy volunteers (during visual language tasks).

RESULTS: Both modalities showed good congruency of the language areas. The mean spatial distance of the centroids and maxima was 9.06 mm and 10.58 mm, respectively, allowing us to define more specific anatomical positions. Postoperatively, language abilities increased in 11% (2 of 18) of the patients, remained unchanged in 83% (15 of 18) of the patients, and decreased in 6% (1 of 18) of the patients, respectively. Signs of language function reorganization detected on both functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography were present in 29% (5 of 17) of the patients. Attenuation of neurovascular coupling was found postoperatively in 17% (3 of 18) of the patients. Monohemispheric language processing cannot be assumed always in patients with brain lesions.

CONCLUSIONS: The more detailed subdivision of language-relevant brain areas shown in this study can help to achieve more radical tumor resection without postoperative language deficits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e41-e59
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume136
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Brain/diagnostic imaging
  • Brain Mapping/methods
  • Brain Neoplasms/surgery
  • Female
  • Glioma/surgery
  • Humans
  • Language
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Magnetoencephalography
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neuronal Plasticity/physiology
  • Young Adult

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