More Complex than Previously Thought: New Insights into The Optimal Administration of the Initial Preference Task

Research output: Journal article (peer-reviewed)Journal article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Initial Preference Task (IPT) is based on the name-letter effect (NLE: individuals prefer name over non-name letters) and is widely used for measuring implicit (automatic) self-esteem. However, its implicitness has been criticized because up to 85% of individuals can become aware of its self-relevant nature (i.e., recognizers; Krizan, 2008). The present experiment assessed differences in name-letter awareness across three different IPT administrations as well as IPT scores across recognizers and non-recognizers. A more elaborated administration (incorporating symbols as filler items) significantly reduced name-letter awareness; furthermore, IPT scores differed between recognizers (higher scores) and non-recognizers (smaller scores). Implications and limitations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-216
Number of pages16
JournalSelf and Identity
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Administration
  • Implicit self-esteem
  • Initial preference task
  • Name-letter effect
  • Recognizers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (all)

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