Individual Differences in How Work and Nonwork Life Domains Contribute to Life Satisfaction: Using Factor Mixture Modeling for Classification

Heike Heidemeier*, Anja S. Göritz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal article (peer-reviewed)Journal article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study used factor mixture modeling to investigate individual differences in how life satisfaction is construed. Referring to the cognitive regulation of well-being we aimed to identify individuals for whom work and nonwork life domains contribute differently to overall life satisfaction. In a sample of 1,704 working adults two subgroups with different response patterns were identified. In the first subgroup work and nonwork life domains contributed equally to overall life satisfaction. In the second subgroup satisfaction with nonwork rather than work-related life domains were important sources of life satisfaction. Furthermore, participants in the second group processed negative affect from the work domain in ways that enabled them to maintain high levels of life satisfaction. We examined the external validity of class assignment and replicated our findings in a second sample. How factor mixture modeling can be used to uncover cognitive mechanisms that operate in evaluations of life satisfaction is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1765-1788
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Happiness Studies
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Factor mixture modeling
  • Life satisfaction
  • Measurement invariance
  • Self-evaluation
  • Well-being paradox
  • Work-nonwork linkages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Individual Differences in How Work and Nonwork Life Domains Contribute to Life Satisfaction: Using Factor Mixture Modeling for Classification'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this