A cross-cultural validation of the implicit positive and negative affect test (IPANAT): Results from ten countries across three continents

Markus Quirin, Monika Wróbel, Andrea Norcini Pala, Stefan Stieger, Jos Brosschot, Miguel Kazén, Joshua A. Hicks, Olga Mitina, Dong Shanchuan, Ruta Lasauskaite, Nicolas Silvestrini, Patrizia Steca, Maria A. Padun, Julius Kuhl

Research output: Journal article (peer-reviewed)Journal article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-report measures of affect come with a number of difficulties that can be circumvented by using indirect measurement procedures. The Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test (IPANAT) is a recently developed measure of automatic activation of representations of affective states and traits that draws on participants' ratings of the extent to which nonsense words purportedly originating from an artificial language bear positive or negative meaning. Here we compared psychometric properties of this procedure across 10 countries and provide versions in corresponding languages (Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Polish, Russian, and Spanish). The results suggest good reliability, metric invariance, and construct validity across countries and languages. The IPANAT thus turns out as a useful tool for the indirect assessment of affect in different languages and cultures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-63
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Journal of Psychological Assessment
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Implicit Affect
  • Indirect Assessment
  • Metric Invariance
  • Negative Affect
  • Positive Affect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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