A case report of septic shock syndrome caused by S. pneumoniae in an immunocompromised patient despite of vaccination

Josef Singer, Christoph Testori, Peter Schellongowski, Ammon Handisurya, Catharina Müller, Eva Maria Reitter, Wolfgang Graninger, Paul Knöbl, Thomas Staudinger, Stefan Winkler, Florian Thalhammer*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal article (peer-reviewed)Case report

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and case presentation: We report a case of septic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in a patient who had undergone splenectomy due to an autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is characterized as a dysfunction of immunoregulation. Although the patient was vaccinated with a conjugated polysaccharide vaccine after the splenectomy, he was still susceptible to S. pneumoniae infection, because the isolated serovar (24F), a serovar long thought to be apathogenic, is not covered by any vaccine currently approved, neither a conjugated nor an unconjugated polysaccharide one. Conclusions: This case demonstrates that, due to presence of different serovars, also infections with bacteria against which patients are vaccinated have to be considered as differential diagnosis. Although vaccine development has extended the coverage of S. pneumoniae from 7 to 23 serovars within recent years, there is still demand for novel vaccines which can provide broader protection also against so-thought "apathogenic" strains, especially for groups at high risk.

Original languageEnglish
Article number442
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS)
  • Case report
  • Overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI)
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae Serovar 24F
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

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